Citrus

Citrus

lemon


Lemon


Lemon is a fruit from the family rutaceae, also known by the Latin name Citrus Liman. Lemons grow on a lemon tree which is up to six meters high. Lemons are used in many ways. Well known is the lemon juice or lemon lemonade. Lemons are also used in furniture polishes, detergents, soaps and shampoos. There are various uses for lemon oils or the wood from a lemon tree. Lemon has also various possible uses in pharmaceutics because of its great health promoting attributes


Navel Orange


Navel Orange


This type is formed due to a single mutation that first occurred on a plantation in Brazil in 1820. When peeled, an undeveloped conjoined twin like fruit was found at the base of the orange. Since the base of the fruit resembles a human navel, the orange is called Navel orange. This is a seedless variety, propagated through cuttings. It's flesh is very juicy and sweet. A variety of the Navel orange is the rare Cara Cara orange, which has a faint flavor of strawberries. Navel orange is cultivated in California, Florida and Riverside.


Valencia Orange


Valencia Orange


This type was first created by William Wilfskill, a Californian agronomist, naming it after the Spanish city of Valencia. It's a late season variety and mostly carries two crops. This fruit is sweet, juicy and has a golden hue to its flesh. They come in medium to large sizes and have thin skin. In the warmer months, the skin is tinged with shades of green, a natural process called regreening.


Ruby Red Grapefruit


Ruby Red Grapefruit


Grapefruit, whose botanical name means "fruit of paradise," is a relative of the orange, with segmented, juicy flesh and a clean, tangy flavor. These fruits are categorized as red, pink or white by their interior color. The World's Healthiest Foods notes that while all colors of grapefruit carry a wealth of health benefits, red grapefruit may be most beneficial of all. Low in calories, high in fiber and phytonutrients, grapefruit is a healthy dietary choice.


Tangerine Orange


Tangerine Orange


The name tangerine comes from Tangier, Morocco which is the port from which tangerines were first shipped to Europe. Tangerines are the common name for a variety of Mandarin oranges. Mandarin oranges are native to southeastern Asia and they are widely cultivated in orange-growing regions of the world. Tangerines are smaller than oranges and oblate in shape, with an easy-to-peel skin. They have a pungent aroma, a thinner rind and the sections can be easily separated. Tangerines are more delicate than oranges and need to be handled with care.


Image of Lime


Limes


Usage: cooking, garnish, beverages, juice


Selection: Good-quality Limes will be medium to large in size, smooth skinned, light to deep-green in color and firm but not too hard.


Avoid: Avoid product that is too small, is soft, wrinkled, rough or has yellow skin.


Storage: Refrigerate whole limes for up to 10 days in a plastic bag. They may last longer, but will have less flavor. Lime slices or wedges should be bagged and refrigerated up to five days. You should never freeze a whole lime, but lime juice or grated lime zest may be frozen for up to four months


Image of a Clementine


Clementine


Usage: Clementine Mandarins are most often eaten out of hand because of their sweet & juicy nature in a convenient package – they make the perfect snack. They are also used in salads – often paired with Fennel, blue cheese and other bold flavors where the sweet citrus notes provide a tempering aspect. Clementine mandarins also do well in jellies and preserves given their high brix (sugar) content. Chefs also enjoy incorporating the flavor components of Clementine Mandarins into fish dishes including halibut, flounder, rockfish and other mildly sweet species. Unlike most citrus fruits, the zest from Clementine Mandarins is considered too bitter for cooking.


Selection & Storage: Select Clementine Mandarins that are slightly soft, yet heavy for their size – indicating a juicy piece of fruit that hasn't been off the tree for too long. Fruit that is very firm tends to be a bit tart – which is common early in the season. The longer these little gems stay on the tree, the more brix (sugar) they will develop. Once they reach your preferred level of sweetness, place remaining fruit in the refrigerator to extend the shelf life.


Avoid: The extreme sweetness of a Clementine is both its appeal as well as its weakness. The higher the brix (sugar level), the more prone a piece of fruit is to decay and mold. Avoid Clementine Mandarins that are overly soft or are starting to show even small spots of brown. They tend to develop decay spots on the inside that will first appear as a brown spot on the skin.